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Eyes in the skies

Andersen Air Force Base’s tower provides a 360 degree view of surrounding airspace. Air traffic controllers are responsible for managing the flow of aircraft through all aspects of their flight and ensuring the safety and efficiency of air traffic on the ground and in the air. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jacob Skovo)

Andersen Air Force Base’s tower provides a 360 degree view of surrounding airspace. Air traffic controllers are responsible for managing the flow of aircraft through all aspects of their flight and ensuring the safety and efficiency of air traffic on the ground and in the air. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jacob Skovo)

Staff Sgt. Nicholas Barsenas, 36th Operations Support Squadron air traffic controller, reads a radar display June 2, 2016, at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. Radar systems allow air traffic controllers to track aircraft as they move through airspace surrounding the island. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jacob Skovo)

Staff Sgt. Nicholas Barsenas, 36th Operations Support Squadron air traffic controller, reads a radar display June 2, 2016, at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. Radar systems allow air traffic controllers to track aircraft as they move through airspace surrounding the island. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jacob Skovo)

Staff Sgt. Nicholas Barsenas, 36th Operations Support Squadron air traffic controller, scans the flightline June 2, 2016, at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. Air traffic controllers support U.S. Pacific Command's continuous bomber presence, which deters potential adversaries and provides reassurance to allies and partners that the U.S. is capable to defend its national security interests in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jacob Skovo)

Staff Sgt. Nicholas Barsenas, 36th Operations Support Squadron air traffic controller, scans the flightline June 2, 2016, at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. Air traffic controllers support U.S. Pacific Command's continuous bomber presence, which deters potential adversaries and provides reassurance to allies and partners that the U.S. is capable to defend its national security interests in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jacob Skovo)

Staff Sgt. Tiffany Degracia, 36th Operations Support Squadron air traffic controller, communicates with flightline operators June 2, 2016, at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. Andersen AFB’s controllers operate by sight but also use radar to assist in improving safety on the flightline. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jacob Skovo)

Staff Sgt. Tiffany Degracia, 36th Operations Support Squadron air traffic controller, communicates with flightline operators June 2, 2016, at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. Andersen AFB’s controllers operate by sight but also use radar to assist in improving safety on the flightline. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jacob Skovo)

Staff Sgt. Tiffany Degracia, 36th Operations Support Squadron air traffic controller, signals a vehicle on the flightline with a light gun June 2, 2016, at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. The light guns flash red, white or green lights in various patterns to signal how to proceed when communication with an aircraft or vehicle is lost. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jacob Skovo)

Staff Sgt. Tiffany Degracia, 36th Operations Support Squadron air traffic controller, signals a vehicle on the flightline with a light gun June 2, 2016, at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. The light guns flash red, white or green lights in various patterns to signal how to proceed when communication with an aircraft or vehicle is lost. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jacob Skovo)

Staff Sgt. Tiffany Degracia, 36th Operations Support Squadron air traffic controller, records flight data for a departing helicopter June 2, 2016, at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. Air traffic controllers support various aircraft to include the MH-60S Seahawk operated by Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron Two Five and deployed aircraft such as the B-52 Stratofortress. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jacob Skovo)

Staff Sgt. Tiffany Degracia, 36th Operations Support Squadron air traffic controller, records flight data for a departing helicopter June 2, 2016, at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. Air traffic controllers support various aircraft to include the MH-60S Seahawk operated by Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron Two Five and deployed aircraft such as the B-52 Stratofortress. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jacob Skovo)

Staff Sgt. Nicholas Barsenas, 36th Operations Support Squadron air traffic controller, uses a tower simulation system June 2, 2016, at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. Air traffic controllers train during normal operations to handle heavy flightline traffic during exercises including Cope North and Valiant Shield. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jacob Skovo)

Staff Sgt. Nicholas Barsenas, 36th Operations Support Squadron air traffic controller, uses a tower simulation system June 2, 2016, at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. Air traffic controllers train during normal operations to handle heavy flightline traffic during exercises including Cope North and Valiant Shield. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jacob Skovo)

Andersen Air Force Base, Guam --