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AFRC, 506th EARS relocated for building demolition

Brig. Gen. Steven Garland, 36th Wing commander, knocks down the first wall, marking the beginning of Bldg. 21000’s demolition Nov. 5, 2013, on Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. The building is being demolished to make use of square footage in other buildings and save energy for the Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Emily A. Bradley/Released)

Brig. Gen. Steven Garland, 36th Wing commander, knocks down the first wall, marking the beginning of Bldg. 21000’s demolition Nov. 5, 2013, on Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. The building is being demolished to make use of square footage in other buildings and save energy for the Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Emily A. Bradley/Released)

Brig. Gen. Steven Garland, 36th Wing commander, addresses workers who are preparing to demolish Bldg. 21000 Nov. 5, 2013, on Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. The building is being demolished to make use of square footage in other buildings and save energy for the Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Emily A. Bradley/Released)

Brig. Gen. Steven Garland, 36th Wing commander, addresses workers who are preparing to demolish Bldg. 21000 Nov. 5, 2013, on Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. The building is being demolished to make use of square footage in other buildings and save energy for the Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Emily A. Bradley/Released)

Brig. Gen. Steven Garland, 36th Wing commander, knocks down a wall with a backhoe, marking the beginning of Bldg. 21000’s demolition Nov. 5, 2013, on Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. The building is being demolished to make use of square footage in other buildings and save energy for the Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Emily A. Bradley/Released)

Brig. Gen. Steven Garland, 36th Wing commander, knocks down a wall with a backhoe, marking the beginning of Bldg. 21000’s demolition Nov. 5, 2013, on Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. The building is being demolished to make use of square footage in other buildings and save energy for the Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Emily A. Bradley/Released)

ANDERSEN AIR FORCE BASE, Guam -- The 36th Civil Engineer Squadron and private contractors began demolition of a section of Bldg. 21000 Nov. 5.

Various organizations previously working out of the building were dispersed permanently across Andersen to utilize empty square footage in other buildings and to save energy.

The project consolidated the 506th Expeditionary Air Refueling Squadron and the 36th Operations Group into one building. The Airman and Family Readiness Center was moved to the Consolidated Support Center in Bldg. 22026, which is adjacent to the Andersen Commissary.

The wing of the building that holds the library, education center and colleges will remain in its current location and intact until an alternate site is decided. However, the other bays will be demolished in three phases.

The first phase is projected to last until Dec. 5. The first stage will take out Bay 12, or the part of the building that held the A&FRC and 506th EARS.

"The rest of the phases will be determined based off of occupants being relocated to facilities around the base," said U.S. Navy Lt. Russell Torgesen, 36th CES engineering and acquisition officer. "Then the buildings will be turned over to the private contractors for interior demolition as early as the end of November."

Once the contractors take control of the building, they will begin hazardous material testing then destruction of interior walls. The 36th CES will begin to clear the exterior portions after the interior is finished.

"What we are doing is a more efficient use of the current space," said Torgesen. "The 36th Wing saves money, reduces energy and lowers maintenance costs."

For more information about the project, call the 36th CES Resource Flight at 366-5055.